In the News

The New York Times on icddr,b's battle against cholera with innovation that cured millions

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Achievement

Ban Ki-moon endorses icddr,b’s work

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ABOUT US

We are an international health research institute based in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

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NEWS

icddr,b joins Emory Global Health Institute’s Child Health and Mortality Prevention Surveillance (CHAMPS) network that explores why children under 5 die in Africa and Asia.

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FEATURE

How a barge-turned-floating hospital played a key role in the fight against cholera

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AR 2015

Our Annual Report showcases year of innovative discoveries, research excellence and global health solutions.

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OUR RESEARCHERS

A selection of our senior scientists, leading figures in public health and medical research

Dr Md. Sirajul Islam

Emeritus Scientist, Enteric and Respiratory Infections.
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Dr Peter Kim Streatfield

Emeritus Scientist, Climate Change and Health.
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Dr Md. Shafiqul Alam Sarker

Senior Scientist, Maternal and Childhood Malnutrition.
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Search our database of researchers

LATEST NEWS, EVENTS & BLOG

Latest News
09 FEBRUARY 2017

Barriers to care-seeking: The tragic persistence of maternal death in Bangladesh

Bangladesh has made particularly exceptional progress in this area. Although Bangladesh has a lower per capita income than India or Pakistan, it has fewer maternal deaths than its richer neighbours. However, much more work remains to be done.

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Feature News
18 JANUARY 2017

How the Cholera bacteria resist viruses that attack them

A new icddr,b study has shown how a proportion of the epidemic cholera bacteria survive attack by viruses that kill bacteria, after an epidemic to cause the subsequent epidemic in the next season–insight that might be useful to prevent and control the disease.

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Feature News
05 JANUARY 2017

The urban-rural divide in non-communicable diseases

NCDs like diabetes and hypertension have been traditionally thought of as “rich country problems”. But the conventional wisdom of global public health, as exemplified by mass immunization campaigns, no longer applies to a rapidly changing and globalised world.

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